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Starting School - Fitting in without losing the magic

We all start out knowing magic. We are born with whirlwinds, forest fires and comets inside of us. We are all born able to sing to birds and read the clouds, and see our destiny in grains of sand.’ Robert McCammon, (*1957) Boy’s Life

And then, as we get older, we learn that magic so acceptable in a practical world – we get yelled at, told off, encouraged to ‘colour within the lines’ and to not make up stories.

My son started school this week – he was so excited, and pleased. And I was so proud – and my heart full to bursting watching him confidently swing his school bag and merrily wave me goodbye.

I’m pleased he is ‘fitting in’, happy he knows the rules and how to act, how to make friends.

My dilemma – my worry. How can I help him hold onto the magic, the whirlwinds and the comets? How can I hold him to be both part of the world, part of the neighbourhood/the society we live in – while also holding onto the magic – the whirlwinds, the stars that shine within?

from my blog Musings from a Practical Mystic

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Comment by Barque on November 6, 2009 at 10:56am
Andy,
I teach part-time in a community college with an approach I hope counteracts that of a "soulless, sterile, for-profit academic enterprise." If you are open and attentive, you will probably find like-minded individuals who engage in the curriculum in a soulful manner. I appreciate that it can be diffcult to be sensitive and exploratory in such an envirnoment, however, if you model this approach, you may be surprised by a nuturing reciprocity. Good luck with your academic adventures. Please keep us posted about your discoveries in the new terrain.
Comment by Waking on November 5, 2009 at 1:51pm
Hi Beth, sorry to flit by like this...but I've glanced at your post and it brought to mind my recent concern about returning to undergraduate school (a necessary evil).
I fret over entering into a soulless, sterile, for-profit academic enterprise and have a hard time imagining being able to connect & engage with the curriculum in a soulful manner. Yet it feels that in order for me to flourish I’m going to have to find some way to do just that.
I intend on coming back here to your post to reflect further on your dilemma, your worry, about your son holding on to the magic through a less-than-magic & imagination friendly acculturation process found in the equally soul-sterile world of K-12 school life and estranged neighborhood "community" / society.

Andy

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